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Minky

Breaking in motors

Hi,  
Sorry if this is has already been discussed, but is there any need to 'break in'  MTB motors?  I've seen it mentioned in guides and seen them 'burn in' a different motor type.  So I was just wondering if and then why.

I tried to search the forum but 'breaking in'  brings up everything.
OldNoob

You don't need to break them in. I test my circuits with alkaleaks anyway, so mine have usually been run a bit at lower power. Certainly don't need to do daft things like running them in buckets if water etc etc.
UKNerfWar

The theory is that running the motors will begin to wear the brushes and bed them into the commutator whilst removing any muck or debris. This will give you a better electrical contact and help reduce arcing.

It's not really necessary since they've likely been run up at the factory as part of QC anyway and it's not like they will be taking massive loads. It's likely that any 'bedding in' will be done within the first few seconds of using the blaster so it's a bit of a waste of time.

Personally, I always bed mine in. Partly due to an old habit from my RC days and partly due to my own QC process. Essentially I run them at ~60% for 5-10 minutes but that's purely for my own peace of mind.

I've never heard of running them in a bucket of water and I can't see why that would be necessary.
Sparky2504

Good to know that the motors don't need breaking in as I'll be doing my first rewire soon and as an electrician the thought of someone running the motors in a bucket of water scares me.
OldNoob

Running in water here.

Debunking here.
Sparky2504

I'd have thought it would just short out across the terminals submerging it in water.
OldNoob

Electricity takes the path of least resistance.
Sparky2504

I know just expected that to be through the water rather than through the coils of the motor.
Minky

"Hold it in your hand"?!  Nutcases. At least MTB didn't do that.  I'll run them a bit at testing. Thanks for the info!
SSGT

Sparky2504 wrote:
I know just expected that to be through the water rather than through the coils of the motor.


Water (at least in it's pure, de-ionised form) is actually a very good insulator. It does readily pick up ions, which makes it no quite so good an insulator pretty quickly, but even then (unless you're using seawater) it'll still present a greater resistance between the motor terminals than the motor windings. The problem is, especially with closed can motors like Rhinos, that you probably won't get all of the water out and you'll end up with parts corroding. If the motor has had it's components (e.g. it's bearings/bushings - especially in the case of sealed ball bearing motors) greased or oiled then you'll also end up removing some of that lubrication - if you can't get to the part that needs to be lubricated to re-lubricate it you'll likely end up causing more harm than good.

It is a good idea to have at least some period of bedding-in where you don't apply too much of a load to the motor (even if that means running at full speed no-load - this shouldn't cause too much of a problem as there won't be too much arcing) but whatever you do you likely won't be able to remove the graphite dust from inside most motor cans anyway. That said, given that I doubt most people even bother with bedding-in the motor brushes (Ryan from MTB has even said that it isn't necessary with Rhinos), it probably isn't too much of an issue. With big electrical machines you normally place some abrasive material over the commutator/slip-rings and manually bed the brushes by hand in rather than letting the motor run and wear away the brushes itself anyway.

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