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Treezy

What's needed for wars other than blatsers and tactical kit?

Youíve got your primary, secondary, and last shot sorted. Youíve got spare mags and storage for them sorted. Youíve got eye protection sorted. Youíre all ready to fight in the next Nerf war.

Iíve seen a few posts about what blasters and tactical gear people should run for wars; starting from your first war, right up to being a seasoned war vet with a dedicated battle rig. But what else do you need? What sort of things are worth taking along for your big day of Nerf war?

Iím gunna throw out a few suggestions, but would really appreciate feedback or other suggestions. I realise that Iím without actual Nerf war experience, but Iíve got loads of experience of going to various events that involve running around fields and living out of the back of your car for a weekend.

1. Spare blasters and accessories:
Sure, your modded flywheel primary works a treat most days, but what happens if it suffers a catastrophic failure? What happens if a soldered connection breaks, or the pump action gearing shreds? Having a spare blaster that you know works solidly in the back of the car for such occasions isnít a bad idea; plus you can always loan it out if someone else has a failure/needs an extra blaster. Of course if youíve got practical accessories that you may not usually choose to run, like grip blasters, pop-up shields, Tri-strike Mega & missile blasters, bring them along, because they may come in useful: you may face a mission where youíll need a missile to complete an objective, and you donít want to be on the team that only has one missile!

2. Tools & spares:
Most Nerf blasters are held together with simple screws, so a small screwdriver to undo your suddenly knackered blaster to see if itís a simple fix is a good idea; especially for blasters that suffer mechanism jams (e.g. Roughcut, Vigilon) that canít be easily cleared without opening the cover.
Likewise, a roll of E tape and/or zip-ties for quick repairs can be handy for things like bodging broken sling mounts. Remember, time may be limited between rounds, so if itís not a quick fix, just grab your spare blaster mentioned in point 1.
Thereís no point in taking loads of spare parts as youíll spend more time tinkering with blasters than actually using them. But a spare mag could be useful in case one of your carried ones buggers up. A spare 5KG spring may come in useful if you find you want to crank up/wind down a springer primary after a few rounds of play. Oh, and some paracord can make a great blaster sling or an impromptu belt to hold pouches.

3. Batteries & Chargers:
Anyone who is part of the #flywheelmasterrace is gunna expend some volts over the course of the day. A backup LiPo pack isnít a bad idea to have with you, because itíll be sodís law that though you plugged your main pack on to charge the night before, you didnít actually turn it on at the mains! If youíre running standard cells, having another full fresh set to hand is really going to be useful if you find your brand new Duracell batteries were a duff batch.
Some venues may have a power point you can plug into to recharge, and while you may not need to do so, likely someone will be glad of the ability throughout the day.

4. Food & Drink:
After a few hours of running about with your adrenaline spiking, youíre gunna get hungry. Having a few snacks to hand to munch between rounds will help to keep your blood sugar up and keep you fuelled. Fruit, chocolate, and cereal bars are great for quick energy top ups, and bananas are a top food for helping to avoid cramp too. Donít be tempted to have a massive meal right before you spend a day running around, because you risk being sluggish and needing the toilet! Save the big meals for afterwards.
Stay hydrated. This is important. With any luck youíll get a chance between rounds to nip back to your car/locker/fixed point and grab some gulps of water. But on really hot summer days or wars that take you away from your fixed point, having a water bottle or hydration pack on you will be handy.

5. First aid and medication:
Youíre running around all day, so itís likely you (or someone) will fall over by accident, and for wars outside there could loads of brambles to rip into your flesh as you run past.  While the organisers will hopefully have a first aid kit, it never hurts to have a few anti-bac wipes to clean out cuts and grazes, and some Savlon and plasters to patch up minor injuries. Kids especially appreciate medical attention for even the smallest of bumps and cuts. Paracetamol and Ibuprofen are also handy to carry Ė just be careful who you dole them out to.
If you need specific medication, make sure you have it with you. Things like epi-pens and inhalers should be carried on you at all times, and itís worth letting the organisers know beforehand what to do in an emergency situation.

6. Clothing:
For the war youíll want something you are comfortable in, can move about in without too much restriction, and will help you regulate body heat. Itís better to be too hot and have layers that you can remove, than be too cold without anything you can put on. T-shirt and joggers may not look as tacti-cool as a full on ghillie-suit and tac-vest, but running around on a hot day youíll be far more comfortable.
Pick your footwear based on the playing location. If itís indoors then a pair or sports shoes will allow you to run around just fine. If youíre going outside, where the ground may be uneven, muddy and rough, youíre not gunna want to have your newest pair of Nikes on. Walking boots etc. will give you better grip and a bit of ankle support in these scenarios.
Gloves can be great if itís cold and wet, as well as looking tacti-cool. Some people may find them restrictive though. Knee pads or knee supports are a brilliant idea if youíre getting super hardcore with your fighting acrobatics/youíre older and your knees are already buggered.
Take a change of clothes with you. Running around for a day makes you hot and sweaty, and sitting in your car driving home, or worse still, going for a meal and drink with your fellow Nerfers while sat in stinky clothes soaked in cold sweat is not comfortable for anyone. Running around in the daytime may seem warm, but as the sun drops so do the temps, so having a jumper/hoodie/jacket to chuck on top is a good idea. Spare shoes and socks may seem overkill, but if youíve been outside in the rain/wet grass, youíll appreciate them so much as you drive home.

Iím sure there are many that will feel a lot of this stuff is superfluous to requirements, but itís far better to have something and not need it, rather than need something and not have it. Plus the majority of whatís listed above could probably fit into a medium rucksack, so isnít an excess to carry.

Your thoughts?
blindgeekuk

As a player? Stuff thats not a primary/secondary/mags/tac gear?

1) Something fun - not every round needs to have a war ready primary - so take something silly and fun - a mega blaster, a rivals blaster etc.

2) WATER - have a bottle on you at all times, and ideally a spare in your team spawn/central safe zone - drink it, refuill it

3) Snacks - both to share, and to keep your energy levels topped up. Note, the community has a few nut free, gluten free, egg free players...

4) A change of t-shirt - you'll be sweaty by the end, do everyone a favour and have deodorant and a change of t-shirt on hand.

5) Plastic bags - hand them out to kids during dart sweeps

6) Painkillers - might be down to my eyesight, but I always have a popunding headache by the end of an event (in fairness, I always have a pounding headache), so have painkillers on hand

7) Knee brace - I don't carry this with me, but have it waiting at home. I find the bending down to collect darts wrecks my knees, so I oput a brace on when I get home.

As an organiser, I always have tools on hand, and spare AA's and IMR's. A well organised war should have a dedicated first aider, because all it takes is one bad fall and you've got a problem.

A Spare lipo isn't essential, you shouldn't be firing enough darts to drain one during a standard afternoon BritNerf style war.

Kneepads, I consider to be part of my tac gear - they protect my knees during games like FreezeTag, and stop my knees getting totally wrecked during dart sweeps
OldNoob

Never once needed a spare battery or to charge a pack at a game. In over 3 years.
Justajolt

Not essential, but I take a camera ^_^

Edit. Food and drink. Especially drink!
Dazzle740

1,  I tend to always ruck up with multiple blasters so always have a choice or on the few occasions a spare. Also loan them out too to few who don't have blasters.

2, I always have a good compliment of tools, screwdrivers, pliers, cutters, tape etc... you never know when they may be needed by myself or others.

3, Don't have spare batteries as such but i do have more then one or two blasters modded to run of Lipo's and I have enough Lipo's for all of them. So push came to shove 1 could be loaned out if required.

4, Always take liquid and food (snacks) of some form to GuN and usually have a few cartons of small cookies or flapjack pieces to share out too.

5, I am a first aider for work and I ALWAYS have a full 1st aid kit in my car just in case but have never been called upon as this area is always well covered at GuN due to the good organising of the events.

6, DOn't usually carry/take spare with me but it's something i may start especially whilst the weather isnt the best at mo. But as mentioned before kneepads make up part of my tactical set-up and I consider them to be very useful in protecting my knees. Because you sometimes don't realise how often you bang/scrap or generally abuse your knees running around like idiots flinging foam.

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